Babelfishing Poetry: "We Have Our Mouth-Hearts"

Babelfishing Poetry: "We Have Our Mouth-Hearts"


Hello? How are you?  Hope you're very well, fine, and dandy.  Here it is again, time for more Babelfishing poetry, where I take song lyrics, run them through an on-line translator such as (but not necessarily) Babelfish, tweak the punctuation a bit, and wind up with a quirky kind of poem.

Our feature this week, a British music hall song written in 1912, is "It's A Long Long Way To Tipperary" (listen to Irish tenor John McCormack sing the song here, or listen to a Rhodesian version of the song, which became popular among Rhodesian soldiers during that country's Bush War in the 1970s, here, or listen to the Red Army Choir perform the song here, or watch a guitarist perform Indian playwright/poet T. P. Kailasam's Kannada-language version here, or listen to a parody of this song written by scientist/musician Sam Hinton as an affirmation of evolution here).  Enjoy. 


We Have Our Mouth-Hearts

Anthony Curran.
Once upon a time he was Irish.
Because the roads are damp,
of course they are all gay!
Facts of selfishness, facts of poverty.
When hears them, he begins.
If you wish service, my lord,
call them fierce warriors, and call them to a multitude.

Time,
the chief of the other.
We have our mouth-hearts.
They are very long.
I know I'm eating!
Success!
She says to me, too many times,
"I'm in the east and west."
There are a lot of people who have lost their hands, and they have a lot of them.


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Cantor Center For The Arts

Cantor Center For The Arts


Here are some pics from a visit to the second-floor exhibits at the newly-reopened Cantor Center For The Arts on the Stanford campus on Sunday.


This is "Viktoria," a cast bronze horse by sculptor Deborah Butterfield.





These books are a small part of a sprawling piece about immigration called "The American Library" by British artist Yinka Shonibare.





A couple of interesting architectural details from the upper floors.







"Chinatown Dragon" by Martin Wong is a recent acquisition by the museum.





This detail from a 15th-Century "Adoration Of The Holy Child" triptych shows that even the angels sometimes need reminders of the words and music when singing hymns of praise.





This screenprint is "Kwa-Gulth Thunderbird Man" by Canadian First Nations artist Tony Hunt Sr.





This child in a detail from the late-19th-Century painting "The Accident" by Willem Geets seems to be calling "Hey You!" directly to viewers.





This is "Madonna In Glory" (1670) by Carlo Dolci.  Interestingly, the museum maintains that historical religious paintings set the stage for contemporary portraiture, our imagery of business, entertainment and sports heroes being derived from Christian images of saints.





"Pink And White Over Red," by Mark Rothko, never not bold.





I like the angularity of this one, "Hoboken" by abstract expressionist Franz Kline.  The museum maintains that abstractionism was a means to represent the world and complex human experiences after WW II.




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Babelfishing Poetry: "Where Is The Taxi When The Black Fleet Season Has Begun?"

Babelfishing Poetry: "Where Is The Taxi When The Black Fleet Season Has Begun?"


Once again, here's more Babelfishing poetry, where I take song lyrics, run them through an on-line translator such as (but not necessarily) Babelfish, convolute the punctuation a bit, and wind up with a quirky kind of poem.

This week's feature, chosen at random, is Shirley Temple's signature song, "On the Good Ship Lollipop" (listen to Temple's version here, or listen to novelty singer Tiny Tim warble his way through the song here, or listen to singer Margaret Whiting's swingin' version here, or listen to one-armed jazz trumpeter Wingy Manone's version here, or listen to a punked-up version, with a couple of F-bombs, by Bazza Bingo here).  Enjoy. 


Where Is The Taxi When The Black Fleet Season Has Begun?

Madam, with exclamation,
I like music and sports.
I was worried.
It's a full-scale project.

I am now in confession.
Then there's a murderer and a belt.
And what will you do?
Do you have ant friends?

The drifting wooden pillars were beautiful.
It's also good to go to a candied fruit shop
on the warm beaches of the Gulf Stock Exchange.
Where is the taxi when the Black Fleet season has begun?

Lemon is absent.
The Klingon factory will be added.
What about the future?
Since then, the enjoyment of chocolate has come.

This is an easy situation for other people.
Bad nut cake.
Virtue must be essential
when you defend your virtue with your honor.

The wooden pillars were beautiful,
the day-scare we've been waiting for.
We came here.
A cookie-like cookie-like wooden boat.


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Alum Rock Park

Alum Rock Park


Here are some pics from a brief visit to Alum Rock Park on Monday, where it was hot, and really not very interesting, and quickly tiring for me.


A little ground squirrel pokes around in the dirt.







This ground squirrel lazes on a log.





Some poison oak is beginning to turn color already.





Another little ground squirrel nibbles a leaf on the trail.





A woodpecker feather on a boulder.




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Monday Movies: Orange Line West-Bound

Monday Movies: Orange Line West-Bound


Monday Movies: 20 seconds (more or less) of video from the world around me.

This week: Twenty seconds of a west-bound VTA Orange Line train approaching Whisman Station, last December.  Enjoy.




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Babelfishing Poetry: "My Earlobe Is A Must-Have Earlobe"

Babelfishing Poetry: "My Earlobe Is A Must-Have Earlobe"


Hello, lovely to see you, so glad you've popped by my unpretentious little blog.  You are just in time for more Babelfishing poetry, where I take song lyrics, run them through an on-line translator such as (but not necessarily) Babelfish, change the punctuation a bit, and wind up with a quirky kind of poem.

Originally released in 1947 as Roy Acuff's recording, "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" was written by Fred Rose and popularized by Willie Nelson (listen to Nelson's version here, or listen to Acuff's almost chipper rendition here, or listen to Olivia Newton-John's interpretation -- and brace yourself for the incongruous jaw harp entrance half-way through (did some clueless producer think that would make her version more authentically "country"?) -- here, or watch UB40's video of their version of the song here).  Enjoy. 


My Earlobe Is A Must-Have Earlobe

The sun is setting as I see it
Indigo-colored eye-catching tears.
I skip it and move on.
I'm sorry.  I'm retired.

As a result, the image of the image is a leg-like attribute.
Upon my sword,
I do remember.
I kept my eyes.

For the face,
we will wear our heavens.
My earlobe is a must-have earlobe.
Selfish eyelids, retained eyelids.


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