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pahavit
Date: 1-9-2010 2:14 PM
Subject: Maguire Peaks, Sunol Regional Wilderness
Security: Public
Tags:arrow, field trip, maguire peaks, sunol, turkey tail fungus, turkey vulture
Maguire Peaks, Sunol Regional Wilderness


Last Sunday D. and I returned to Sunol Regional Wilderness. We went on the Maguire Peaks Trail, and we both took some pics. First, here's mine.


Turkey tail fungus grows on a rotting log.





The moss is lush in the cool, damp, shady canyon.





A rotting log is host to a whole miniature community of plants, lichens and fungi.





The minerals and other nutrients released from this dead log by the fungi growing on it will nourish new life and keep the forest healthy.





Looking back toward the trailhead on Welch Creek Rd.





The arrow says go this way.





The trail goes through a meadow.





As we cross the meadow, more of the summit comes into view.







The arrow says go this way, but I don't know, it looks kinda tipsy . . .





Views from the meadow, looking south and east.







The arrow says go this way.





This oak's boughs will remain leafless until after the winter rains.





A hillside of deciduous and live oaks.





The view east from Maguire Peaks Loop Trail.





Looking northwest from the north side of Maguire Peaks.





Paradise in three words: Sunol Regional Wilderness.




❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧  ❧

D. took the following pics.


Some of the little plants growing along the lower, woodsy part of the trail.







Turkey tail fungus growing out of a log.





Nettle is one of the plants sprouting up along the trail.  Don't touch, it stings! 





A female red-shafted flicker pauses in a clearing as the trail wends through oak woodland on the mountainside above the meadow.





Haze fills the valleys, obscuring distant ridges.







Solar panels in a distant glen below Maguire Peaks are probably powering a water trough pump for the herds of cattle that graze in the parkland.





Up close to the peak, we watch turkey vultures soaring on the thermals below.





A rocky outcrop close to the summit.





The oaks are a dominant presence in the landscape.











Recent rains have made the grass quite green, and the afternoon sun lends a golden glow to the meadow as we make our way back.




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