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Pahavit's Universe

pahavit
Date: 6-30-2011 12:53 AM
Subject: Stevens Creek County Park
Security: Public
Tags:bat, bee, bench, bird, canopy, chaparral, dam, feather, field trip, floof, flower, geocache, insect, junk, maple, native wildflower, poison oak, reservoir, rose, rust, sign, spillway, stevens creek county park, stevens creek reservoir, stevens creek trail
Stevens Creek County Park


Saturday D. and I returned to Stevens Creek County Park to walk along the Stevens Creek/Tony Look Trail on the east shore of the reservoir. Here are some of the pics I took.


Coyote mint and bee at the trailhead.





Everlasting always reminds me of popcorn.





Hey look, it's a geocache!





It's full of crappy stuff inside (but the little bat is kind of cool).





On a spur next to the geocache we see a huge junk pile.  So of course we investigate.





Rusty engine is rusty.





Shadows on an overturned safe.





A trough full of blue polystyrene.





A study in greens: fiberglass piece and polystyrene chunk.





Rusty wheel is rusty.  Rusty barbecue is rusty.







Have I mentioned the area was full of rusty stuff?





The area was also full of little Centaury flowers poking up around the rusted, discarded junk.





Lizard condos, a.k.a. cinder blocks.





More centaury.





Rusty loopy things, and a busted-up trash can.







Centaury, and everlasting.







Centaury and rust, and Golden Yarrow.







Back on the trail.





Floof!





The trail takes us through a mixed oak woodland.





Creambush, also known as Oceanspray, is related to the rose.





A sunny stretch of trail as it wends its way around a hillside.





We get our first glimpse of Stevens Creek Reservoir.







We get our first glimpse of people enjoying recreation on the reservoir.





Purple Clarkia (*Clarkia purpurea), and the bigleaf maple canopy overhead.







This past winter's abundant rainfall has filled the reservoir so high the arroyo willows in the first pic's middle distance are considerably under water.







Looking back along the trail.





As the trial climbs we get another view of the reservoir.





Sticky Monkeyflower, and clarkia in front of sticky monkeyflower.







We climb higher.





Someone came well-prepared for every possible fishing contingency.





Deerweed with bee.





The trail rises and begins to turn away from the shore as it rounds a steep bluff at a narrow place in the canyon.





This yarrow blossom is like its own little world.





Another peek at the reservoir from a bend in the trail, looking north down the canyon.





"Hey Joyce, okay if we sit on your bench?"





A narrow section of the trail, with a steep drop-off into a ravine at one side.





Pitcher Sage.





Abruptly the trail takes a turn across a south-facing slope and we are surrounded by tall chaparral and drenched in hot sun.





The view from the high point on the trail, with Stevens Creek Quarry scarring the hillside just beyond the reservoir.





The trail descends back into woodlands and we see Indian Pink, a carnation relative.





In a small glade, a katydid takes a rest on a California wild rose.





The trail descends toward the reservoir through the welcome shade of the woods.





A bat box.



Where Batman send his unwelcome guests? 



A sign at the junction of the Loop Trail.  Tony Look was a conservationist and environmentalist.  A thousand thanks to the 400 volunteers who built the trail.





The view from the Loop Trail as it traces the shore of a cove.





A cormorant in a tree at the water's edge.









An owl feather next to the trail, and coyote mint.







One of the many kayaks on the reservoir.





At the shore, an ancient almond tree bears fruit.





The trail takes us close to the dam.





A female Common Merganser rests on the boom in front of the dam's spillway.





One of several wood bridges spanning ravines along the trail.  This one is near Joyce's Bench, where we pause on our way back.







More views of the late afternoon reservoir.






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