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Pahavit's Universe

pahavit
Date: 9-3-2011 1:45 AM
Subject: Cooley Landing
Security: Public
Tags:bee, bird, butterfly, cooley landing, fence, field trip, flower, grass, ground squirrel, insect, junk, lizard, marsh, rebar, rust
Cooley Landing


Last Saturday D. and I returned to Cooley Landing on the edge of San Francisco Bay, and I took these pics.


Views of the marsh.







The immediate area is strewn with rubble, making it a semi-rustscape.





One of the many planes taking off from the nearby Palo Alto Municipal Airport goes overhead.





Marsh gumplant is in bloom all over the marshes.  The native Ohlone Indians used the sticky, gummy resin from the gumplant buds as a treatment for arthritis.









There is a busy bee around this stand of gumplant.





The pollen baskets, or corbiculae, on her legs are full.





The California ground squirrels scampering throughout the rubble in this area keep an eye on me.







Disapproving aground squirrel disapproves.





Not only is the rubble a playground for ground squirrels but for western fence lizards as well.





Another look at the marsh, and some of the rubble.





And more rubble.





Holey rubble.







My life often feels like this. 





Fennel buds stand out against the discarded, upended hood of a car.  They seem happy next to rubble and wreckage.





This looks to me like, maybe, a long time ago, it used to be a quarter panel. 





Butterfly on weed.  It seems happy on the weed.





Looking east-southeast.





Tawny grasses are a sign of late summer.  They have gone for many months without any rain at all.





An unusual piece of rubble makes an impromptu place to sit to look south over San Francisco Bay.





A view of the Santa Cruz Mountain to the west.





Another one of the countless rusty things strewn about.





Looking northeast over the Bay from the jetty, the Dumbarton Bridge on the left and Mt. Diablo barely visible center-left.





As the tide ebbs, Western sea roaches (Ligia occidentalis) crawl about on the riprap, feeding on the thin film of algae covering rocks and debris at the water's edge.  Sometimes they can be observed dipping their rear ends into the water to moisten the gills inside.  They are arthropods related to pillbugs and woodlice, not true cockroaches.





Late afternoon, low tide.  Time to go home.




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