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pahavit
Date: 3-6-2012 12:31 AM
Subject: Purisima Creek Redwoods & El Corte De Madera Open Space Preserves
Security: Public
Tags:banana slug, el corte de madera creek preserve, fern, field trip, flower, fungus, lichen, mistletoe, mushroom, native wildflower, purisima creek redwoods, redwood, slug
Purisima Creek Redwoods & El Corte De Madera Open Space Preserves

On a lovely, mild Sunday D. and I decided to visit Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve, because we hadn't been there before. So we went, but the trails were too steep for my dysfunctional mitochondria and we had to stop sooner than we planned, so we also spent a little time at nearby El Corte de Madera Creek Open Space Preserve as well, and I managed to take a few pics.


We park beneath a huge redwood.





And beneath the redwoods grow lovely redwood sorrel.





We set out on the Redwood Trail.





Milkmaids, a broccoli relative and another woodland wildflower.





The canopy above.  These are all second-growth redwoods.





A frond of deer fern reaches up into a shaft of sunlight slanting through the forest.





As the trail winds steeply up hill and down dale, I have to stop many times to rest my aching legs or catch my breath.  What better opportunity to take a pic of the canopy overhead?





A mushroom growing along the trail on our way back.





The sun streaming through the canopy near El Corte de Madera Creek Preserve.





The redwood violet is yellow, not violet.  But it is a violet.





Sierra Morena Trail at El Corte de Madera Creek Preserve goes through a mixed evergreen forest.






Douglas firs.




A mushroom grows out of a stump.





Tree lungwort is a type of lichen that is very sensitive to air pollution.  It grows only where the air is very pure, and can be found in North American old growth forests.  This one is drying up due to no winter rains.





A mosaic of decay has set in to this fallen bay laurel leaf.





Wood strawberry leaves are sprouting.





Looking up another huge Douglas fir.  This one has a massive parasitic growth on it (the dark mass in the branches on the right).





Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe is a destructive parasite on Douglas firs.  It can take many years to kill the host tree.





The canopy overhead.





A banana slug looks for decaying things to eat alongside the trail.




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