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Pahavit's Universe

pahavit
Date: 3-13-2012 12:14 AM
Subject: Sanborn County Park
Security: Public
Tags:abandoned, banana slug, bird, canopy, duck, fern, field trip, flower, fungus, lake, mallard, mushroom, mystery object, mystery structure, native wildflower, pipe, power lines, reservoir, sanborn, slug, spider, wolf spider
Sanborn County Park

On Saturday D. and I decided to visit Sanborn County Park, and I took these pics.


We set out on the John Nicholas Trail, heading into Lyndon Canyon, which coincidentally parallels the San Andreas Earthquake Fault.





A forget-me-not is beginning to bloom.





There's nothing like a job half-done, is there?



(To their, credit, however, the bag was not there when we came back up the trail later on.)



Turkey tails.





One of the many huge redwood trees in the forest.





More of the forest canopy.





More bracket fungi on a dead log.





The trail wends its way through a mixed evergreen forest of oak, madrone, Douglas fir, tanbark oak and redwood.







A delicate maidenhair fern near a little stream tumbling down one of the many gulches in the canyon.







The bay laurels are flowering.





More trail pics.









A broccoli relative, milk maids are a common woodland wildflower in spring.





A glimpse into the woods.





As the trail crosses another gulch, we take a look up and down.







Miner's lettuce is edible, but probably not really super-yummy.  It's another common spring wildflower.





A helicopter flies overhead.





As we get closer to Lake Ranch Reservoir, we begin to see debris in the woods left over from the ranching days, before this was a county park.





Then, as the trail rounds a bend, we behold lovely Lake Ranch Reservoir.







How to drain the lake with one easy twist of the wrist.  (Alternate title: This Is Where They Steer The Lake)



Even though this is called a reservoir (it is dammed), since it sits within the San Andreas Fault it is probably a natural sag pond.



Mallards on the lake.









A structure next to the reservoir that may or may not be a spillway of sorts, and it has graffiti in it, of course.





A row of pipes fencing off the cube structure catches my eye.





A forest glade next to the lake.





California buttercup.





Another view of the lake.





A mystery object at the far end of the lake.





A wolf spider (probably Alopecosa kochi) pauses in its scurry across the trail.





A grove of arroyo willows at the far end of the lake is coming into leaf.





Another look at the mystery device.  It appears to be able to float up and down on those poles as the lake level changes.





A coot.





And a baby coot (cootlet?)





Looking back from the far end of the lake.





Along a spur trail at the north end of the lake we see some abandoned farm equipment rusting in the underbrush, half-overgrown with blackberry vines.











A clearing nearby is full of periwinkles.





A power line, because what's a field trip without a power line pic?  They are everywhere we go.





On our way back we see several banana slugs along the trail.









A mushroom sprouts from a mossy embankment beside the trail.





We also saw a coyote in the underbrush near the beginning of our walk, but it was too far away to get a pic.  And on the way back we kept on hearing a great horned owl hooting in the woods, accompanying us for several minutes.

Also, not once, but twice dog owners on the trail tried to pass off their aggressive dogs as friendly.  One off-leash dog ran up to us and tried to bite D.'s ankle, and his person said he was just trying to sniff him to say hi.  Um, no, the dog had his teeth bared.  And later on, the second (leashed) dog growled at me loudly with her hackles up, and her person said she was trying to make friends.  Um, again, no, I don't buy it.  These were some of the rare unpleasant dog encounters we've had on our outings.  We don't see many dogs on the trails (a lot of trails don't allow them in the first place), but when we do it's usually fine.  Odd that the 2 unpleasant ones happened on the same day, on the same trail.


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